levels of questions
rhetorical devices
argumentation
logic terms
logical fallacies
100

"Have you ever played Jeopardy before?"

experiential

100

explicit comparison of 2 unlike things using like, as, etc. to demonstrate similarity With the air conditioning broken, the room felt like an oven.

simile

100

a Greek word that means credibility (or character) of the speaker/writer

ethos

100

a difference between two statements, beliefs, or ideas about something that means they cannot both be true

contradiction

100

We shouldn't follow Donald Trump's plan because he has a stupid-looking hairdo.

ad hominem

200

Should games be used as part of language learning classrooms?

thematic

200

little related story, often own experience

relevant anecdote

200

a more general assumption –in an argumentative essay, this is the underlying assumption that you and most or all of your readers – any reasonable person – would agree with.

major premise

200

causing a lot of disagreement, because many people have strong opinions about the subject being discussed

controversial

200

My roommate doesn't wear a seat belt, and never got hurt in a car accident. Therefore seat belts are unnecessary.

anecdotal evidence/hasty generalization

300

How many questions are in each game of Jeopardy on this template?

literal

300

complete sentence “old saying” teaches a lesson (Don’t put all your eggs in one basket, A stitch in time saves nine)

proverb

300

a certain type of logical argument, deductive reasoning in which you derive a conclusion from two premises, that consists of three parts

logical syllogism or categorical syllogism

300

one of several things that influence or cause a situation

factor

300

We have always had a final exam in this class, so it must be a good idea.

appeal to tradition

400

What is the meaning of the word "jeopardy," and why was it chosen for this game show?

interpretive

400

literally "opposite of thesis" - starting with the opposite of your main idea, often setting up untrue prevailing thought & then surprising the reader with the truth

antithesis

400

a Greek word that means emotional connection to the audience – in an academic essay, this means using stories, similes, metaphors, descriptions, examples, etc. that make the reader feel strong emotions

pathos

400

someone who supports something or persuades people to do something ; advocate; antonym of opponent

proponent

400

84% of the people polled think BCC should require students to wear special hats. Therefore, we should.

bandwagon fallacy/appeal to popularity

500

How well did your teacher select the items for this review?

evaluative

500

imaginary situation; fictional but set up to demonstrate a real point

hypothetical situation

500

part of a syllogism: a more specific assumption or inference that you will show to be true with evidence


minor premise

500

the information that someone has discovered as a result of their study, work etc.

findings

500

If we play this game in class, pretty soon that's all we will do, and we will never get any serious work done.

slippery slope

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