Psychoanalysis
Psychodynamic Theories
Humanistic Theories
Trait Theories
Social-Cognitive Theories

100

This operates on the pleasure principle, demanding immediate gratification.

What is the id?

100

Modern-day approaches to psychoanalysis that focus on the unconscious and the importance of childhood experiences.

What are the psychodynamic theories?

100

This theory views personality with a focus on the potential for healthy personal growth.

What is the humanistic theory?

100

A characteristic pattern of behavior or a disposition to feel and act.

What is a trait?

100

Views behavior as influenced by the interaction between people's traits and their social context.

What is the social-cognitive perspective?

200

Freud's theory of personality that attributes thoughts and actions to unconscious motives and conflicts.

What is psychoanalysis?

200

This psychodynamic theorist proposed the idea of the collective unconscious, which is the concept of a shared, inherited reservoir of memory traces from our species' history.

Who is Carl Jung?

200

According to Maslow, one of the ultimate psychological needs that arises after basic physical and psychological needs are met and self esteem is achieved.

What is self-actualization?

200

In the trait perspective, this technique identifies clusters of correlated test items that tap basic components of intelligence.

What is factor analysis?

200

The interacting influences of behavior, internal cognition, and environment.

What is reciprocal determinism?

300

In Psychoanalysis, a method of exploring the unconscious in which the person relaxes and says whatever comes to mind.

What is Free Association?

300

A personality test, such as the Rorschach, that provides ambiguous stimuli designed to trigger projection of one's inner dynamics.

What is a projective test?

300

A concept created by Abraham Maslow that includes achieving physiological needs, safety, love and belonging, etc.

What is the Hierarchy of Needs?

300

The most widely researched and clinically used of all personality tests that was originally developed to identify emotional disorders.

What is the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)?

300

Overestimating others' noticing and evaluating of our appearance, performance, and blunders.

What is the spotlight effect?

400

According to Freud, this defense mechanism underlies all other defense mechanisms.

What is repression?

400

A type of projective test in which people express their inner feelings and interests through the stories they make up about ambiguous scenes.

What is the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT)?

400

According to Rogers, an attitude of total acceptance toward another person.

What is unconditional positive regard?

400

A test developed by testing a pool of items and then selecting those that discriminate between groups.

What is an empirically-derived test?

400

Assumed to be the center of personality, the organizer of our thoughts, feelings, and actions.

What is the self?

500

According to Freud, this aspect of personality represents internalized ideals and provides standards for judgment and for future goals.

What is the superego?

500

The tendency to overestimate the extent to which others share our beliefs and our behaviors.

What is the false-consensus effect?

500

Rogers' person-centered perspective that held that a growth-promoting climate required these three (3) conditions.

What are genuineness, acceptance, and empathy?

500

This personality test was created by Isabel Briggs Myers and Katharine Briggs, and used Carl Jung's personality types to sort people.

What is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)?

500

Giving priority to the goals of one's group and defining one's identity accordingly.

What is collectivism?