Brain Anatomy
Neurotransmitters
Neural Diseases
Diagnostic Techniques
Neuroscience Grab Bag

100

The part of the brain responsible for the most basic, vital functions (breathing, heart rate...)
What is the brain stem?

100

The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter.
What is GABA?

100

A disease characterized by a degradation of the myelin sheath.
What is MS?

100

A brain imaging technique that measures the electrical activity of neurons through the scalp. (Often used in sleep research)
What is EEG?

100

The two main divisions of the nervous system.
What is the central and the peripheral nervous system?

200

The lobe that processes complex thought and performs executive functions, problem-making, decision-making, etc. in humans.
What is the frontal lobe?

200

One common area where acetylcholine is used.
What is the neuromuscular junction?

200

A disease that is caused by a deterioration of neurons throughout the brain over time.
What is Alzheimer's disease?

200

What is the general principle that brain imaging techniques use to visualize brain activation?
What is blood flow/consumption in the brain?

200

The area where neurotransmitters are released.
What is the synaptic cleft?

300

The group of brain structures associated with emotion.
What is the limbic system (amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus)?

300

An important excitatory neurotransmitter involved in long-term potentiation (learning).
What is glutamate?

300

The neurotransmitter whose levels are significantly decreased in Parkinson's disease.
What is dopamine?

300

A brain imaging technique that measures oxygen consumption by the brain using radioactivity.
What is a PET scan?

300

A brain imaging technique that looks at brain structures that are activated during a certain activity.
What is fMRI?

400

The brain structure involved in memory consolidation.
What is the hippocampus?

400

The two main receptors for glutamate.
What are AMPA and NMDA?

400

A mental disorder that includes paranoia, hallucinations, lower mood and delusions.
What is schizophrenia?

400

An imaging technique that picks up on weak magnetic fields emitted by neurons.
What is MEG?

400

A time frame in which the brain must experience certain important events and stimuli in order to develop properly.
What is a critical period?

500

Can a signal travel in both directions along a neuron?
Yes, but it does not.

500

What is the neurotransmitter involved in the reward pathway and addiction?
What is dopamine?

500

The pathway that is altered in addiction disorders.
What is the reward pathway?

500

A brain imaging technique that detects concentrations of various chemicals such as neurotransmitters.
What is MRS? (magnetic resonance spectroscopy)

500

The paring back of neural connections during childhood and development.
What is synaptic pruning?