Literary Devices 1
Literary Devices 2
Literary Devices 3
Literary Devices 4
Literary Devices 5
100

What is repetition? 

Instance in which a word, phrase or structure is stated several times in order to emphasize a particular idea and/or build rhythm

100

What is an antagonist?

Usually the principal character or force in opposition to the protagonist or hero of a narrative or drama  

100

What is a protagonist? 

The main character/hero/heroine in a narrative or drama

100

Name that Device-Language and sensory details that help the reader create a mental picture of the characters, setting, and action

What is imagery?

100

What is characterization?

The actions, words, nature, appearance or traits of somebody or something

200

What is diction?

The word choice

200

Name that Device-spoken or written expressions not meant to be taken literally (e.g. similes, metaphors, personification) 

Figurative language

200

What is conflict?

The struggle between opposing forces that is the basis of a story’s plot

200

What is the climax?

The turning point or crisis point in a plot

200

Name that Device-a figure of speech that compares two unlike things without using comparative language such as like or as (e.g., “Her eyes are stars.”)

Metaphor
300

Name that Device-a figure of speech in which an object, animal, or idea is given human characteristics (e.g., “My computer stared at me.”) 

Personification 

300

Name that Device-a figure of speech in which the truth is exaggerated or overstated for emphasis – or humor (e.g., “I’m so hungry I could eat a horse.”) 

Hyperbole

300

Name that Device-where an event occurs that is unexpected, in the sense that it is somehow the opposite of what might be expected or appropriate (e.g., “The lifeguard drowned.”)

Irony

300

Name that Device-a person, place, or object that stands for something beyond itself (e.g., the eagle is a bird, but it also is the symbol of  American freedom, justice, and liberty) 

Symbolism 

300

Name that Device-a figure of speech in which words such as like, as, resembles, and than are used to compare two unlike things (e.g., “She has eyes like stars.”)

Simile

400

My dog is a pig when it is time for supper.

What is a metaphor. 

400

What is an allusion?

A reference to someone or something that is known from history, literature, religion, politics, sports, science, or some other branch of culture (e.g., an unfair match may be referred at as a “David and Goliath” confrontation)

400

Name that Device-the meanings, associations or emotions a word evokes (e.g., house vs. home vs. dwelling)

Connotation 

400

Name that Device-the use of clues or hints at events that will occur later in the story 

Foreshadowing 

400

What is the mood?

The general sense or feeling the text creates for the reader

500

What is an allegory?

Work of literature in which characters, settings, and events represent other people, events, or concepts (e.g. Animal Farm)

500

What are the different types of conflict?

Internal-Character vs. self

External-character vs. character, character vs. nature, character vs. society

500

What are the different types of irony?

Verbal Irony

Situational Irony

Dramatic Irony

500

What is a theme?

An arguable statement about the significance/universal truth/message of a piece of literature; a theme is NOT written as a fact, a topic (one word), a suggestion (do this/don’t do that), or an opinion (good/bad, right/wrong)

500

Name that Device-a recurring important idea or image; it differs from a theme in that it can be expressed as a single word or fragmentary phrase, while a theme must be expressed as a complete sentence (e.g., water, weather)

Motif

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