True or False
Correct or Wrong
Fix It Yourself
Create Your Own
Mystery

100

You can tell if a sentence is a run-on sentence by it's length.
False, a run-on sentence is a structural flaw.

100

I like apples, I eat them all the time.
Wrong.

100

My dog loves to eat, he steals my snacks all the time
Varies.

100

Using "and."
Varies.

100

What is a run-on sentence?
A run-on sentence has at least two parts, either one of which can stand by itself, but the two parts have been smooshed together instead of being properly connect.

200

A run on sentence has at least two parts, usually two independent clauses.
True.

200

The sun is high, put on some sunblock.
Wrong.

200

My sister can be very annoying, she always steals my things.
Varies.

200

Using "so."
Varies.

200

What is a comma?
A comma is a punctuation mark.

300

When you use a comma to connect two independent clauses, it must be accompanied by a little conjunction.
True.

300

This next chapter has a lot of difficult information in it, so you should start studying right away.
Correct.

300

By 7:30, it was too late the show had already begun.
Varies.

300

Using "yet."
Varies.

300

MAKE YOUR OWN RUN-ON SENTENCE.
Varies.

400

A run-on sentence is sometimes called a fused-sentence.
True.

400

This is not such an nice playground, still, the kids love it.
Wrong.

400

The boy showed us his tickets someone gave them to him.
Varies.

400

Using ";"
Varies.

400

TRUE OR FALSE: You can have a comma-splice sentence without using a comma.
False.

500

When two independent clauses are connected by only a comma, they constitute a run-on sentence that is called a comma-splice.
True

500

Mr. Johnson has sent his four children to ivy-league colleges, however, he has sacrificed his health working day and night in that dusty bakery.
Wrong.

500

People already believed the precious metals to be divine so their use in money intensified its allure.
Varies.

500

Using "however."
Varies.

500

CORRECT OR WRONG: Knowing that millions of people around the world would be watching in person and on television and expecting great things from him — at least one more gold medal for America, if not another world record — during this, his fourth and surely his last appearance in the World Olympics, and realizing that his legs could no longer carry him down the runway with the same blazing speed and confidence in making a huge, eye-popping leap that they were capable of a few years ago when he set world records in the 100-meter dash and in the 400-meter relay and won a silver medal in the long jump, the renowned sprinter and track-and-field personality Carl Lewis, who had known pressure from fans and media before but never, even as a professional runner, this kind of pressure, made only a few appearances in races during the few months before the Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, partly because he was afraid of raising expectations even higher and he did not want to be distracted by interviews and adoring fans who would follow him into stores and restaurants demanding autographs and photo-opportunities, but mostly because he wanted to conserve his energies and concentrate, like a martial arts expert, on the job at hand: winning his favorite competition, the long jump, and bringing home another Gold Medal for the United States, the most fitting conclusion to his brilliant career in track and field.
Correct.