Rhetorical Situation
Appeals
Rhetorical Strategies
Parts of an Argument
Parts of an Argument Pt II
100

The issue, problem, or situation that causes a person to speak or write

Exigence 

100

To make the audience feel something (an emotion) about what is presented to it

Pathos

100

The last time you had an original idea, what did you do with it?

Rhetorical Question

100

a definitive statement about the way things are, were, will be, or should be.

Claim

100

the way an author sets up their text

Organizational Patterns

200

What the writer hopes to accomplish by writing or speaking

Purpose

200

Try to persuade audience using facts, logic, or reason

Logos

200

Luxottica, the 800-pound gorilla of the industry, controlled more than 80 percent of the eyewear market.

Metaphor/Hyperbole

200

limits to an argument. They oftentimes include words such as 'most', 'usually', 'always' or 'sometimes'.

Qualifiers

200

Show the opposing side has an unsound/unfair/weak argument

Refuation

300

the person or group of people the writer crafts the message for

Audience

300

Typically uses “credible” or seemingly trustworthy people to convey message    

Ethos

300

But now there are GOATs everywhere we turn. Even worse than the acronym’s overuse is its doltish simplicity.

Loaded Language 

300

an argument that one’s opposition would make

Counterargument 

300

Which sentence contains a qualifier?

  1. College graduates struggle to repay their student loans. 

  2. Most college graduates struggle to repay their student loans. 

2

400

What makes a writer qualified to write about a specific topic?

education, experience, publications, honors/achievements/recognition, how extensive their research is

400

"Among nearly a thousand scientists at the Food and Drug Administration, more than 40 percent were afraid that they would face retaliation if they spoke up publicly about safety concerns."

Logos

400

[W]e shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.

Asyndeton

400

to acknowledge the validity of some aspect of the counterargument, to acknowledge some aspect of the opposition’s concerns, to acknowledge a shortcoming of your argument  

Concession

400

Which sentence contains a qualifier? 

  1.  Often, minimum wage earners have to make the choice between paying a bill or buying groceries. 

  2. Minimum wage earners can not afford to pay for both utilities and groceries.

1

500

What is the difference between a writer’s purpose and their message?

purpose: what they hope to accomplish (what they want from the audience) 

message: main points; the argument itself (how they achieve their purpose)

500

“There are so few originals in life,” says renowned executive Mellody Hobson, because people are afraid to “speak up and stand out.” What are the habits of the people whose originality extended beyond appearance to effective action?

Ethos

500

It will not reduce our need for arms or allies or programs of assistance to others.

Polysyndeton 

500

Which sentence contains a concession? 

[1] Yes, these tires are expensive. [2] But why would you risk your baby’s life by buying cheap tires that may cause your car to skid during heavy rain? 

1

500

When appropriate, why is it important to concede in an argument?

to appear fair, knowledgeable, and understanding of the complexities of an issue

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