Healthy Coping Skills
Unhealthy Coping Skills
True or False
Does it Require a Coping Skill?
Explain it
100

What is a healthier eating fruits or eating junk food?

Eating fruits everyday

100

List as many as you can

100

The same coping skills work for everyone.

False.

100

You are sitting in class working and playing a game

No

100

Why it is important to identify positive coping skills that work for yourself?

200

What do you always do?

I always read a book. I always play with my mom. I always play video games.

200

Is Self-medicating an unhealthy coping skill?

True

200

A helpful way to stop negative feelings is to distract yourself with coping skills.

True 

200

You just finished a test that was draining and more difficult than you expected. 

Yes!

200

Who can benefit from using coping skills? AND When should they be used?

Everyone! All the time!

300

What is a healthy coping skill you have used this week?

300

What is an example of an unhealthy coping skill?

Answers Vary (Using drugs and alcohol, fighting, running away, too much screen time, stuffing one's feelings (not communicating about what is bothering you)

300

Coping skills are only needed when you're struggling with negative emotions.

False

300

Your little brother is running around and unplugs the video game by accident while you are in the middle of a game.

Yes!

300

What are some coping skills you use or would like to try using?

400

What is a healthy coping skill to use when you're feeling overwhelmed?

400

What is the difference between an unhealthy coping skill and a healthy coping skill? Extra points for examples of each!

They are both coping skills and therefore alleviate your negative feelings, however, the difference is...

Unhealthy Coping Skills only help to relieve your depression, anxiety, or stress while you're doing it or for the short term and may have negative impacts if used too often. (examples- substance use, self-harm, overeating, bullying or harming others, or too much screen time.)

Healthy Coping Skills help relieve your depression, anxiety, or stress for the longer and may have long-term benefits. (examples- exercise, finding hobbies and interests, being outside, walking, communicating your feelings to yourself and others, mindfulness practices.)

400

It's important to have lots of coping tools in your "toolbox" to pull from.

True

400

You heard a rumor spread about you and you want to confront the person you said it. 

Yes! You need to use a coping skill and make sure your calm prior to trying to resolve a conflict and listen to others perspectives. 

400

What makes something a "coping skill?"

A coping skill is anything that helps you to calm down and regain self-control.

500

Coping skills should only be used when one is feelings uncomfortable emotions such as anger, depression, and stress?

No, you need to practice coping skills all the time. practicing coping skills all the time will remind you to use them when experiencing strong emotions as well as help them become more effective. 

500

When does watching tv, scrolling social media, sleeping, etc become an unhealthy coping tool, AND why?

When you are doing it all the time or more than any other coping skills

Because it does not help relieve your depression, anxiety, or stress long term; it only helps in the moment.

500

It is important to identify your feelings to help you calm down. 

True, identify your feelings so you can utilize coping skills that will help you deal with that feeling when faced similar situations in the future. 

500

You don't have anxiety or depression and things are going really well for you right now.

You may not need a coping skill but this is a good time to practice self-care.

500

When are you suppose to use coping skills? 

1) Before- coping skills to help you prepare for or prevent negative feelings (ex. grounding tools, breathing, identifying potential triggers)

2) During- coping skills to help you regulate your emotions while you are experiencing something that triggers your negative emotions (ex. breathing, drinking water, taking breaks, walking)

3) Right After- coping skills that help you to calm down or regulate after you have experienced something that triggers you (ex. physical movement, grounding tools, body scans, mindfulness practices, talking to a support person, music)

4) Ongoing/Regular- coping skills or self-care practices that help you to relax and regulate your emotions long-term (ex. meaningful activities that you enjoy, spending time with your support people, having time to yourself, sleeping well, exercise, mindfulness practices)

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